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Client Name
Polk County Conservation
Client Type
Project Type
Services Provided
  • ADA Compliance Review & Analysis
  • Bicycle & Pedestrian Planning
  • Boundary & Retracement Surveys
  • Construction Administration
  • Construction Observation
  • Construction Staking
  • Environmental Permitting
  • Environmental Studies
  • Funding Assistance
  • Hydrologic Modeling
  • Lake & Stream Restoration
  • Public Engagement & Meeting Facilitation
  • Threatened & Endangered Species Studies
  • Topographic Survey & Subsurface Utility Engineering
  • Trail Design & Planning
  • Trailhead & Oasis Design
  • Wetland & Stream Delineation & Mitigation
Project Manager
Contact Rich Voelker, PE
Transportation Business Unit Leader

Constructed in 2013, the Polk County segment of the Gay Lea Wilson Trail extended the existing recreational trail north along the Four Mile Creek Greenbelt to NE 54th Avenue. At NE 54th Avenue, the alignment turns west and runs adjacent to the existing road within the existing right-of-way to SE 29th Street.

This 10-foot wide trail is a total of 2.5 miles long and connects to the Ankeny segment of the Gay Lea Wilson Trail that was also constructed in 2013. This trail is located in a floodplain with both wetlands and Indiana Bat habitat present throughout. Therefore, the trail alignment was carefully designed to minimize impacts, and where unavoidable, mitigation measures were taken.

Snyder & Associates provided the preliminary and final design, as well as construction phase services for the Polk County Segment of the Gay Lea Wilson Trail. At the three bridges (E Broadway Avenue, Interstate 80, and NE 54th Avenue), our team reviewed the original construction drawings and recognized that the bridges had silted in over time. Therefore, excavation at each of the bridges re-established the original plan grades and thereby allowed the trail to fit under the bridges without impeding flows.